Image publishing and usage

Images are published primarily on this website and can be found in the relevant galleries.

On occasion our images may be shared on Facebook either by ourselves or games organisers for promotional and/or merchandise purposes.

All images are available to players for personal, non-commercial, use with credit given to the photographer. Copyright is retained by the photographer.

Hi-resolution, non-watermarked images, prints and other items are available for purchase.

 

Take downs and no-photo requests

We recognise that players may not wish to appear in photos, so we operate a no-quarrel take down policy.

If you would like an image removed, we will delete it from our website and on social media as soon as we are able.

Please note that if the image has been screen-grabbed from our website, and published by someone else (ie on Facebook) and you bring it to our attention, we will ask them to also take it down. However, we may be unable to compel them to do so, especially if they have been shared onwards.

If you would like us to not take your photo, please let photographers on site know and we will endeavour to not capture any images of you, and will also check through images before publishing. In the event that any to make it onto the website accidentally (for instance in group shots or a background) please email us and let us know.

We apologise, but for logistical reasons we are not able to provide galleries of images for pre-approval before publishing to our website. We do, though, not publish images directly to social media without allowing a few days for take down requests to come through.

 

We can take one of two approaches to photography in game:

 

In character / In Kit’ Photographers will be dressed in appropriate costume and be willing to interact with players as a crew role – including plot-drops and so forth. In this instance, we attempt to conceal our cameras as far as is practicable and used as unobtrusively as possible. Some games may only allow photography in character as part of the plot or setting.

Theatrical Black Photographers can be ‘invisible’ to players. In this case we wear (unsurprisingly) black clothing and avoid, wherever possible, interaction with players, who will also be briefed to ignore the photographer. Again, cameras will be used as unobtrusively as possible.